Nathan Zipfel

Nathan Zipfel

Monday, 15 September 2014 20:41

Building Official Interest

Building Official Interest

Now that you've found that long lost and neglected cemetery, one of the questions that you first have is "What can I do to get my elected officials interested in the restoration and preservation of this cemetery?" One of the keys to this is educating them. Well-informed officials are crucial to the future efforts of cemetery preservation! Make sure your town and state officials are up to date on the current state of your cemetery. There are several ways that you can accomplish this:

  • Take your mayor, council member, state legislator, U.S. Representative or Senator on a tour of a first a neglected cemetery followed by a visit to a restored cemetery if possible and urge their support for national and local pro-cemetery preservation policies and laws. Explain to them how the restored cemetery benefits the community where as the neglected cemetery casts a shadow on it.
  • Include them in a re-dedication, ribbon cutting, open house or other cemetery related event. If possible attempt to get them involved. Offer to let them say a few words.
  • Present and publicize awards for elected officials who have done the most during the past year to promote cemetery preservation.
  • Hold a letter-writing campaign. Encourage your supporters to contact their elected officials and newspaper columns to state their views and call for action on cemetery preservation issues. Let them know that the voters feel strongly about this and it will get their attention.
  • Attend a town meeting or public hearing and speak up for policies that benefit your cemetery and preservation in general.
Monday, 15 September 2014 20:41

Documenting A Cemetery

Documenting A Cemetery

Old cemeteries represent an important heritage resource worldwide. Unfortunately, many of the grave memorials in these cemeteries are deteriorating at an alarming rate. There is no doubt that many of the inscriptions, motifs and art designs that are faintly visible today will disappear altogether in another generation. Detailed cemetery recording provides us with a permanent record of these sites, and a point of reference for future research and conservation. The accurate transcription and publishing of cemetery records is important because it preserves the record on the marker, even if the marker itself is lost.
A uniform and systematic way of recording these heritage sites is important. What features are important to record? Where do we start? What do we do with the information when finished? All these are relevant questions faced by prospective recorders.

Documenting a cemetery should include a map detailing the organization of graves, a data recording and filing system using inventory sheets, and some historical and biographical research. Additional information gathered may include an epitaph record, condition reports, videos, and a photograph file. We highly recommend the Standards for Transcribing Cemetery Headstones as developed by B. W. Hutchison.

Before starting a recording project, check whether one has already been done. Even if an earlier recording has been made, it is worthwhile to confirm and update the data, especially grave condition, and add information that might have been omitted.

Planning for a recording project may take months of work, lots of organization and above all, commitment. The initial step is to obtain written permission from the managing authority or owner of the cemetery. Next, plan the recording to take place during the summer months. Make sure all the supplies are ready as needed and recorders have some knowledge of their task.

You may want to do rubbings of some of the harder to read stones. Information on the process can be found here.

In the sections below you will find tips on how to best do your own recording

Tools and Materials Needed

Notebook & pencils
A large sponge
A gallon jug of water
Mirror abt 5"x7" size
4" scraper
Stiff handle natural soft bristle brush
Straight edge
Camera

Get written permission to enter if the cemetery is on private land. Be respectful of the property owner's rights. Close gates and keep on roads. Don't drive across pastures or plowed ground. You want the farmer or rancher on YOUR side. You are his guest.

Do your registry on a bright sunny day. Many of the old stones will be badly eroded and the bright light will help you. It is also more comfortable on you, it will be a long day, usually. It can also be harder to work on a very windy day. A 5 gallon bucket makes thing to carry supplies in and at the same time you will have something to sit on. After a couple of hours, your legs begin to get tired just standing.

Take something along to eat and drink as you will be there for a while. Go to the bathroom before you leave home unless you have a particular fondness for copperheads.

Use the sun to help you read the stones. If you are having trouble reading the old stones, record the stones facing East in the morning and the stones facing West in the afternoon. The small mirror can be used to reflect light across the face to create shadows in the engravings on the stone.

If the stone cannot be read after these attempts, You may want to do a rubbing of the stone.

The location of each cemetery should be included with directions by road mileage from the nearest major intersection or other permanent landmark.
All the markers in each cemetery should be copied, preferably in order by row number and marker number. This requirement may seem superfluous, but there are past cases where some unknown selection process was used, whereby certain markers were purposefully omitted from the survey. Do not omit any markers.
The markers are not arranged in any cemetery alphabetically. Cemetery surveys of the individual markers should be presented in the order the markers are located, usually in order by row number and marker number, and not in alphabetical order. This makes it much easier to physically locate any particular marker and maintain possible family relationships for adjacent markers. Also, in the event any marker becomes missing or illegible, it is possible to determine its exact location within the cemetery.
Last but not least, when you leave the cemetery, clean up after yourself and others. Take nothing but pictures, leave nothing but tracks

Monday, 15 September 2014 20:39

Building Replacement Markers

Building Replacement Markers

The following suggestion for building an inexpensive grave marker comes from "Bonedigger" <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
1 Build a frame to hold the concrete in place until it cures. The form is made from 1"x 6" boards with plywood. Here is a description of the forms.
2 - 1x6x24" vertical sides
2 - 1x6x18" horizontal sides
Place one of each lengths into a tee shape, square them and screw them together. The top of the tee is your base so turn it upside down and the top becomes the side of your floor of the form. Cut a piece of plywood 18x18" to tie the two tees together and your floor is finished. Use screws to tie the tees to the plywood floor. Don't use nails anywhere; you don't want to hammer anything to get the forms off when the concrete dries. Cut 2 pieces of plywood approximately 14"x18" for the front and back. this front is where you will stick your letters on. When ready screw them in place [after letters are glued on]. 4 more pieces of plywood finish the form. They will be about 14"x6" to be horizontal and vertical end caps for the ends of the tees. All these are screwed into place. Leave the top open to pour in the concrete mix.

2 Cut out letters and numbers.

3 Glue the numbers inside the form you built in 1.above. There is a gotcha here! Glue the letters as if you were looking thru the wood to the letters. In other words the glue goes on the front of the letters not on the back as you would normally glue on stuff. Use the kind of glue that you set floor tiles with for two reasons a] it holds firmly until the concrete is poured b] it releases as soon as the concrete is cured but the impressions are lasting and as deep as the thickness that you made the letters. Imagine for a minute that the front of the form is glass and you are looking thru the glass to the interior of the form what you see is the writing you want to put on the marker just as you want to read it. Keep this thought in mind as you are gluing the letters in place.

4 When you have the form made and letters glued into place [glue has set] take a paint brush and spread oil, about a 30 weight heavy oil all over the letters and front side inside of the form so the concrete will not stick to the letters or to the front side of the form. If desired oil the whole inside for ease of operations.

5 Mix the concrete a little wetter than you would normally pour a sidewalk then pour it and let the concrete cure for several days probably 3 or more days is best. then remove the form and voila you have a tombstone with proper looking message that will last until some idiot decides to break it with a sledge hammer or worse.

6 I put a little reinforcement in my concrete to make it more durable. i.e. two little pieces of pipe running top to bottom inside the form. Or you can use a little grill work e.g. wire mesh or any old steel or iron rods lying around will strengthen the concrete.

7 There are many variations you can choose. I cut out the letters on my scroll saw but a band saw will work. Probably you can talk a local friendly woodworker into making the letters free for you. They should be made from 3/8" thick plywood. Letters any thicker would probably be too hard to remove from your forms without damaging the image you want to leave impressed in the concrete.

This design is based upon 2 bags of concrete mix at approximately $2.00 each at 40 pounds each so the final marker weighs about 90 pounds.

Carneyville St. Thomas Catholic Cemetery
Sheridan, Sheridan County, Wyoming

Cemetery: Carneyville St. Thomas Catholic Cemetery

Other: Kleenburn Cemetery

Sign: No

Street: Padlock Ranch Office 8420 U S Highway 14 Ranchester, Wy 82839

City: Sheridan, Wy Approx. 7-9 miles north on Acme Exit

Township: T57N

County: Sheridan/Holy Name Parish

State: Wyoming

Nation: USA

Zip: 82801

Status: Abandoned

Size: Medium

Directions: 7 to 9 miles north of Sheridan on the Acme Exit east of I-90

Type: Road-public

Location: Rural

Terrain: Hillside

Watersource: No

Features: Small trees & bushes; prairie grasses

Property: Private

Access: Permission-required

Enclosure: Fence

Gate: Non-locking

Established: 1908

Gravestones: 165

Oldest: October 7, 1908

Newest: January 13, 1940

Removed: Unknown

Relocated: No

Repairs: No

Methods: Adhesives

Restoration: Yes

Association: No

Records: Yes

Inventory: Yes

Availability:

Landscaping: No

Paths: No

Trees: Yes

Crypts: No

Fencing: Yes

Brickwork: No

Ironwork: No

Sculpture: No

Fountains: No

Roads: No

Buildings: No

Cement: Yes

Granite: Unsure

Marble: Yes

Native: Unsure

Slate: No

Others: Unsure

Wood: Yes

Materials: Unsure

Architectural: Yes

Angels: No

Draperies: No

Fraternal: No

Hands: Unsure

Lambs: Yes

Monograms: Unsure

Plants: Yes

Photos: No

Religious: Yes

Scrollwork: Yes

Urns: Unsure

Carvings: Yes

Condition: Cemetery neglected

Unmarked: Yes

Broken: Yes

Toppled: Yes

Disintegrating: Yes

Buried: Unsure

Weather: Unknown

Pollution: No

Vandalized: Yes

Report: No

VA: Gravestones-Overturned

VA: Gravestones-Broken

Overgrowth: Graves-Disturbing

Overgrowth: Gravestones-Disturbing

Drainage: Good

Problem: Apathy

Owner: Business

Use: Agricultural

Bordering: Transportation

Change: Unknown

Reason: Roads

Visited: Rarely

Archeology: No

Habitat: Yes

Contacted: People in the community who may interested in helping, local chapter of the Knights of Columbus, Holy Name Church officials

name: Jeanne Sanchez

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Date: February 28, 2003

Surnames:

Arnieri,Arzy Bachlet,Bachlett, Banis, Barbula, Barnaidi, Baonk, Bauril, Belmond, Belmont, Bielesz, Bobek, Bogzier, Bojko, Bondi, Bostoski, Bury, Byrtus, Carbone, Carello, Cavaleria, Chepchor(Czepczor), Christi, Cielinsok, Colosomo,Czrny, Daniels, Di Cecesara, Durante Eccle Fratti Gavito, Gazur, Goutz, Haratyk, Herman, Horacheck, Jagoda, Jaron, Jarczyk, Jaworski, Jeleswonski, Jourosick, Kaiser, Kioshk, Kobieliesz, Kohut, Kostenvauer, Kristy, Krayana, Krzlok, Kukuczka, Kukuzka, Kuzma Laboy, Lahy, Larulla, Lasola, Laya (Leja), Legerski, Legersky, Ligoski, Luke, Lukasik, Malyjurek, Manychek, Marosok, Martenik, Martynek, Meghalt, Mehalik, Mehalleck, Meinjade, Menegas, Mircle, Molinik, Montagnia, Morvieck, Moska, Motyka, Nannaroni, Nickles, Niemietz, Niesh, Panigotti, Paniogetti, Parot, Paulus, Pendula, Porenbaki, Porinski, Posi, Ramirez, Robin, Roski, Rosky, Roy, Rulli, Ruski, Ruskie, Russian, Sabo, Sczuka, Selig, Shuriok, Sieczkouski, Silla, Silva, Skurzek, Skurzok, Skurok, Slovacheck, Stetz, Susa (Sus), Szbuscek, Szczuka, Szewczyk, Tarulla, Trover, Turner, Turow, Ubaldi, Uraszek, Vawrcath, Vennundi, Wavwracz, Weselka, Wisnirwski, Yallowizer, Yeropola, Zogata, Zumbaca, Zowada

Other_Information:

Support:

Jeanne Sanchez Reference Assistant Librarian/Wyoming Room Sheridan Co. Library System 335 West Alger Sheridan, Wy 82801 307 674-8585 ext 7

Submitted by:
The email address found below contains an "_" as the second character. To send email to this person, you must remove the "_" from the address. Email addresses are displayed in this way so that marketers cannot intercept them for junk mail purposes.

name: Jeanne Sanchez

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Date: February 28, 2003

Sweet Cemetery
Stockbridge, Calumet County, Wisconsin

Date: May 16, 2001

Cemetery: Abandoned Family/ Sweet Cemetery
Established: 1850
Street: N4215 Hwy 55-Stockbridge Wisconsin/ Earl Ecker Revokeable Trust / Ecker Construction Co.
Type: Road-public
City: Stockbridge Town 3 miles south on hwy 55
Township: Stockbridge Township
County: Calumet County
State: Wisconsin
Nation: USA
Zip: 53088
Nearby: Intersection of County Road F and Hwy 55
Location: Rural-mixed
Land: Hillside
Water: Yes
Features: Cemetery is close to a small creek called Roberts Creek- surrounded and over grown with Lilac bushes
Sign: No
Land Type: Private
Access: Closed
Enclosure: Natural
Gate: None
Status: Abandoned
Size: Small
Unmarked graves: Yes
Gravestones: 6 to 10
Broken gravestones: Yes
Toppled gravestones: Yes
Buried gravestones: Unsure
Removed Gravestones: Yes
Weather problems: Yes
Pollution problems: No
Oldest grave: 1849
Newest grave: 1875
Association: No
Records: Unsure
Inventory: Unsure
Records location:
Condition: Cemetery in danger of destruction
Vandalized: Yes
Police report: No
VA: Gravestones-Overturned
VA: Gravestones-Broken
VA: Gravestones-Stolen
Overgrowth: Gravestones-Damaging
Vegetation: Trees
Vegetation: Ground-Cover
Vegetation: Moss
Vegetation: Vines
Drainage: Seasonal problem
Problem: Access denied
Problem: Apathy
Problem: Disintegrating Headstones
Work Status: Planning stages
Owner: Cemetery
Use: Industrial
Bordering: Transportation
Change: Unknown
Reason: Agriculture
Visited: Unknown
Archeology: Unknown
Contacted: I have contacted several of the old local historians - non of which know who to contact to see if we can get in there to help clean it up- or help get funding to save it.

Other Information

This poor little cemetery is closed off to the rest of the world and is soon to be forgotten if measures are not taken now to prevent it's total disappearance. It is so over grown it is not visibly a place of rest for the people who now call it their finial resting place.

Support

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Submitted by:

name: Terri Lee
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Milwaukee County Pauper Cemetery
Wauwatosa, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

Updated: September 1, 2000

Cemetery: Milwaukee County Pauper Cemeteries
Street:
City: Wauwatosa
County: Milwaukee
State: WI
Nation: USA
Zip: 53226
Nearby: US 41/45 and Watertown Plank Road
Land Type: Public
Status: Abandoned
Accessible: Yes
Unmarked graves: Yes
Graves within: 10,000
Oldest grave: 1852? First recorded 1882
Newest grave: 1974
Records: No
Inventory: Yes
Records location: The State Historical Society of Wisconsin and The Great Lakes Archaeological Center of Milwaukee
Owner: Milwaukee County Parks Department
Current Condition: Cemetery in danger of destruction
Overgrown-trees
Overgrown-ground cover
Overgrown-vines
Buried Headstones
Other problems: A water retaining basin is planned for the site and thus would require moving the bodies and people have been throwing trash in it.
Previous contacts: The State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Milwaukee County Historical Society, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, The Great Lakes Archaeological Center
Current Status: Planning stages

Update

A forth cemetery was found which includes between 200 and 400 graves. Milwaukee County wants to put a rain water retention pond right where two known cemeteries are located. The graves have to either be excavated and reburied elsewhere, or the retention ponds need to go someplace else.

Submitted by / Contact for additional Information:

name: Jen Fleischmann
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Evergreen Cemetery
Racine, Racine County, Wisconsin


Cemetery: Evergreen
Other:

Sign: No

Street: a couple blocks south of 21st street around and under the sewer treatment plant

City: Racine

Township:

County: Racine

State: Wisconsin

Nation: United states

Zip: 53405 or adjoining

Status: Abandoned

Size: Large

Directions: On the lakefront under and surrounding the sewer treatment plant

Type: Road-public

Location: Urban

Terrain: Hillside

Watersource: Yes

Features: There are only a couple small pine trees .

Property: Private

Access: Permission-required

Enclosure: Fence

Gate: Locks

Established: 1851

Gravestones: Before the (partial) removal and destruction of large portion there was originally around 1400

Oldest: I've uncovered an obelisk that was dated 1855 but reports say it was the resting place of many of the early settlers of this area which began in the late 1830's.

Newest: 1920's

Removed: Yes

Relocated: Unsure

Repairs: No

Methods: Adhesives

Restoration: No

Association: No

Records: Unsure

Inventory: Unsure

Availability:

Landscaping: No

Paths: No

Trees: No

Crypts: Yes

Fencing: Yes

Brickwork: Yes

Ironwork: Yes

Sculpture: Yes

Fountains: Yes

Roads: Yes

Buildings: Yes

Cement: No

Granite: No

Marble: No

Native: Yes

Slate: Unsure

Others: Yes

Wood: Unsure

Materials: Unsure

Architectural: Yes

Angels: Unsure

Draperies: Unsure

Fraternal: Unsure

Hands: Unsure

Lambs: Unsure

Monograms: Unsure

Plants: Yes

Photos: No

Religious: Unsure

Scrollwork: Yes

Urns: Unsure

Carvings: Yes

Condition: Cemetery in danger of destruction

Unmarked: Yes

Broken: No

Toppled: Yes

Disintegrating: Yes

Buried: Yes

Weather: Yes

Pollution: No

Vandalized: Yes

Report: No

VA1: Gravestones-Overturned

VA2:

VA3: Gravestones-Stolen

VA4:

VA5: Graves-Desecrated

Overgrowth: None

Overgrowth1:

Overgrowth2:

Overgrowth3:

Overgrowth4:

GroundCover:

Moss:

Vines:

Drainage: Good

Problem1: Encroachment

Problem2: Apathy

Owner: Business

Use: Commercial

Bordering: Recreational

Change: Smaller

Reason: Commercial

Visited: Unknown

Archeology: No

Habitat: Unknown

Contacted: When I found the 1855 obelisk I immediately informed the construction company assuming they would do the right thing and instead the discovery was somehow covered up the next day trying to conceal it.After that my friend whom I showed it to the night I found it was angered at the attempted concealment told the mayor and the newspaper.Still nothing was done and they tried to pass it off as a discarded headstone.Then I contacted a friend of mine who is a local historian which is where I obtained most of my information from doccuments and newspaper reports of the past 70 years.

Surnames:

Originally many of the early settlers to this area.I've heard rumor of a possible list but as of yet haven't seen or acquired it.

Other_Information:

This cemetary HAD around 1400 burial sites.In a 1928 Racine Journal article.The city removed squatters that lived there supposedly to make a city park.At that time the cemetary was in bad shape and there were reports of graves washing out of the hillside and general neglect.In the 1930's the area was chosen for the site of the sewer treatment plant. The city claimed they moved the remains of the buried to mound cemetery.However there are only around 400-500 reported to have been moved.Where the other 500-1000 minus the ones that were actually displaced due to erosion (without the help of an earth moving machine)is not on report.There have been numerous accounts after the supposed relocation by the city and sewertreatment plant of skulls and pelvises turning up during later excavations on the treatment grounds and in areas the earth was taken to as landfill.Information about the plants construction says the bluff was originally 25ft.above the lakes water level and it was lowered to 7ft.and extended out into the lake with the rearranged earth(and most likely burial remains).I have an 1883 map that shows the location of the cemetery and part of the area is undisturbed but no headstones remain.I am trying to find out how I would go about getting permission to locate and properly relocate or protect the remaining graves.Any leads would be greatly appreciated.Time is of the essence due to a newer and larger sewer treatment plant is currently under construction.

Support:

Submitted by:
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name: Jeffrey Friso

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Date: november 15 2002

English Prairie Cemetery
Beaver Dam, Dodge County, Wisconsin

Date: 11/21/00

Cemetery: English Prairie
Street:
City: Beaver Dam
Township: Westford
County: Dodge
State: Wisconsin
Nation: USA
Zip:
Nearby:
Land Type: Private
Status: Abandoned
Accessible: Yes
Unmarked graves: Yes
Graves within: 30
Oldest grave:
Newest grave:
Records: Yes
Inventory: Unsure
Records location: Beaver Dam Public Library
Owner:
Condition: Cemetery neglected
Broken Headstones
Fallen Headstones
Previous contacts:
Work Status: The current status of this cemetery is: Unknown

Submitted by / Contact for additional Information:

name: Roger K. Ellis
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Coates-Durley Cemetery
Platteville, Grant County, Wisconsin

Date: 19 April, 2001

Cemetery: Coates-Durley
Established: @1840
Street: County Road O
City: Platteville, Wisconsin About 5 miles away
Township: Harrison
County: Grant
State: Wisconsin
Nation: U. S. A.
Zip:
Nearby: Sharp curve in County Road O
Reached by: Crossing property-private
Location: Rural-mixed
Land: Hillside
Water: No
Features: Sits on a small knoll
Sign: No
Land Type: Private
Access: Permission-required
Surrounded by: None
Gate: None
Status: Abandoned
Size: Small
Unmarked graves: Yes
Markers:
Gravestones: 15-20 but no stones
Broken gravestones: Yes
Toppled gravestones: No
Buried gravestones: Yes
Removed Gravestones: Yes
Weather problems: Unknown
Pollution problems: No
Oldest grave: 1842
Newest grave: 1876
Association: No
Records: No
Inventory: Yes
Records location: In 1975 Grant Co. Genealogical Society read the stones stacked against a tree
Condition: Cemetery destroyed
Vandalized: Yes
Police report: No
VA: Broken gravestones
VA: Stolen gravestones
Vegetation: None
Drainage: Good
Problem: Encroachment
Problem: Apathy
Problem: Disintegrating Headstones
Work Status: Planning stages
Owner: Private
Use: Agricultural
Bordering: Agricultural
Change: Smaller
Reason: Agriculture
Visited: Unknown
Archeology: No
Previous contacts: County registrar of deeds, previous property owners, township clerk, Burial Sites Preservation unit and many others, including others who have relatives buried there

Other information

An extended family group is trying to get the cemetery protected and place some stones there. An exclusion was present in deed from 1920, but was inadvertently left out when the property went up for Sheriffs sale in 1936. The farm family that lived there from 1920-1990 has removed most evidence that a cemetery ever existed. All but a small plot has been put into crops, and bits of tombstone are scattered through the field or tossed aside. Nothing recognizable remains of most that were read in 1975.

Submitted By:

name: Lyle Potter
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Chambers Family Cemetery
Franklin, Vernon County, Wisconsin

Date: September 27, 2000

Cemetery: William Chambers Family Cemetery
Street: Green Acres Road
City: Town of Franklin T.12N.-R. 5-4 W. 28
County: Vernon County
State: Wisconsin
Nation: U.S.
Zip: 54665
Nearby: Green Acres Road runs to the east from "J" and Sullivan Road runs west from "J"
Land Type: Private
Status: Abandoned
Accessible: Unsure
Unmarked graves: Unsure
Graves within: 4 marked but there should be one more
Oldest grave: January 15 1863
Newest grave: February 22 1868
Records: Unsure
Inventory: Unsure
Records location:
Owner: The land owners are Joseph and Darlene Howell. The Chambers Family has been in touch with them and are in agreement that something should be done.
Condition: Cemetery neglected
Overgrown-trees
Overgrown-ground cover
Overgrown-vines
Broken Headstones
Buried Headstones
Disintegrating Headstones
Fallen Headstones
Other problems: Trying to find out what can be done. Who is responsible and if they would care for it. Chambers family would be more than happy to share in the load. Also worry that future owners may not be willing to have it cared for or kept up.
Previous contacts: The State Historical Society of Wisconsin Burial Sites Preservation Program of 816 State Street in Madison Wisconsin 53706
Work Status: Planning stages

Submitted by / Contact for additional Information:

name: Theresa Prerost
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